Hot Swappable Raspberry Pi Rack

Hackaday

The Raspberry Pi has inspired many a hacker to take the inexpensive (~$35) microcomputer to the enterprise level. From bitcoin miners to clusters, the Raspberry Pi has found itself at the heart of many large-scale projects.

On hackaday.io [Dave] served up his own contribution with his Raspberry Pi Rack. Inspired by enterprise blade servers, he wanted to house multiple Raspberry Pi boards in a single enclosure providing power and Ethernet. The spacing between the blades and the open sides allow for each Pi to cool without the additional power and cost of fans.

Starting with an ATX power supply and Ethernet switch, Dave created a base that housed the components that would be shared by all the Pis. Using a 3D model of a Pi he found online, he began working on the hotswap enclosures. After “dozens of iterations” he created a sled that would hold a Pi in place with…

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The Tiniest SD Card Locker

Hackaday

sdlocker-tiny

In case you weren’t aware, that little ‘write protect’ switch on your SD cards probably doesn’t do anything. It’s only a switch, really, and if an SD card reader doesn’t bother to send that signal to your computer, it’s completely ineffective. Then there’s the question of your OS actually doing something with that write protect signal.

The better way to go about write protecting an SD card is using the TMP_WRITE_PROTECT bit on the SD card’s controller. [Nephiel] came up with an amazingly small device to set that bit, with the entire circuit fitting inside an old Playstation memory card.

[Nephiel] based his project on [Karl Lunt]’s SD Card Locker we saw late last year. [Karl]’s SD Locker uses an ATMega328 microcontroller, a pair of AA batteries, and an SD card socket to perform the bit toggling. This is still a very small device that fits inside an Altoids tin…

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Here’s Pi In Your Eye – HUD Goggles

Hackaday

[John Ohno] has found what is perhaps the best possible use for steampunk goggles: framing a monocular display for a Raspberry Pi-based wearable computer. [John]’s eventual goal for the computer is a zzstructure-based personal organizer and general notifier. We covered [John]’s zzstructure emulator to our great delight in July 2011. Go ahead and check that out, because it’s awesome. We’ll wait here.

[John] has been interested in wearable computing for some time, but is unimpressed with Google Glass. He had read up on turning head-mounted displays into monocular devices and recognized a great opportunity when his friend gave him most of an Adafruit display. With some steampunk goggles he’d bought at an anime convention, he started on the path to becoming a Gargoyle. He encountered a few problems along the way, namely SD card fail, display output issues, and general keep-the-parts-together stuff, but came out smelling like a rose. [John] has…

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Raspberry Pi camera board coming early next year

They promised quarter 4 of 2012.

Hackaday

We’ve seen hundreds of builds tinker around with the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi. They’re great for bridging the gap between physical sensors and a virtual world, but there are a few more unused and ignored pins on the Raspberry Pi. The folks at the Raspberry Pi foundation are finally giving these unused pins a life of their own with the new camera module for our favorite single board computer.

The specs for the camera are fairly impressive – it can record H.264 video at 1080p and 30 frames per second. Best of all, it costs only $25.

There are a few more hurdles to pass before the Raspi foundation can send this board out to manufacturers. They still need to make sure the ribbon cable doesn’t emit any interference, but if all goes right the camera module should be available early next year.

You can see the camera in action in the…

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Using Arduino shields with the Raspi

Hackaday

With hundreds of Arduino shields available for any imaginable application, it’s a shame they can’t be used with the Raspberry Pi. Breaking out the Raspi GPIO pins to Arduino-compatible headers would allow makers and tinkerers to reuse their shields with a far more capable computing platform.

The folks over at Cooking Hacks realized a Raspi to Arduino shield bridge would be an awesome device, so they made their own, complete with a software library that allows you to port your Arduino code directly to the Raspberry Pi.

There are a few limitations with the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO headers; the Raspi doesn’t have analog inputs, so the Cooking Hacks team added an 8-channel ADC. Along with analog inputs and the headers required to pop a shield on the board, there’s also a socket for an XBee module.

The software library contains most of the general Arduino functions such as digitalWrite() and digitalRead(). There Serial…

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200 pound, WiFi deploying robot ran over my foot

Hackaday

[Adam Bercu] and [Dan Landers] from Artisan’s Asylum in Somerville, MA brought a very, very cool toy to Maker Faire this year. It’s a two hundred pound WiFi repeater deploying robot able to amble across unforgiving terrain and my foot.

The robot is controlled through a web interface with the help of a front-mounted web cam with pan and tilt controls. All the signals are sent through a WiFi connection to a node.js web server; not the best way to communicate with a robot over long distances, but [Adam] and [Dan] have a few tricks up their sleeve.

On the back of the robot are two Pelican cases loaded up with a battery and a Linksys WRT54G wireless router. When the robot reaches the limits of its range, it activates a solenoid, dropping a WiFi repeater. This repeater has enough battery juice to stay powered for about a day and a…

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Weekend projects

While waiting for all kinds of accessories for the Pi to start my projects, just can’t cross my hands and do thing.

The excitement brought by the Raspberry Pi has made a pure software engineer crossed the line of no return — I had been a guy who finished three whole electronics books within a month.

The most practical way to deal with my itchy hands is to make something handy.

Sunday @ Office. Call me an engineer, I have no life.

ImageImageImage

Honestly it sounds crap, more books and chats to acoustic professionals will do. Thanks for the joy comes along with DIY, I’ll have these speaker drivers do their best. 🙂

P.S. Micro servos have arrived, on my way to some tests.Image